Tag Archives: personal finance

Aloysa’s Reading Picks

First and foremost: thank you everyone who supported, promoted, stopped by and commented on The Kitchen Sink while I was away. You helped me tremendously, and my Alexa ranking dropped to 372,206!!

By the way, if you want to find out more about me, read my interview @Modern Tightwad!

My article Beware of Men Counting Pennies was featured in the Carnival of Personal Finance #284hosted by Sweating the Big Stuff ,and it was one of the editor’s picks!

It took me a while to catch up with my work. Sometimes I think it is better not to go on vacation. But I am all caught up now – more or less, and I am back to blogging, writing and reading.

Family Lessons in Frugality

I learned the word “frugality” from my American friend. We were at lunch talking about shopping. She said that she likes good bargains, thinks about herself as “frugal” and doesn’t settle for “cheap.” Even though my English was really good by then, I still didn’t know what “frugal” meant. My friend explained that it meant “spending wisely.”

Lately the life style of being frugal has become somewhat of a phenomena. Everyone is having heated discussions about it. Bloggers passionately write about it. People try to accurately define it. Why being frugal is such a popular notion? Probably because it is very difficult to be frugal in a consumerist culture (read about my financial discoveries in Saving Money Today). Then I thought about my own life experience and decided to compare my Russian definition of frugality with American definition.

Personal Finance in a Non-Confrontational Way

What kind of blogs do you read? I like to read a wide variety of blogs from writing blogs, travel, photography to personal finance. One of my favorite blogs is The Simple Dollar: Financial Talk For the Rest of Us. Some of you already know him. Some of you never heard of him. His name is Trent Hamm, and he writes about finance and self-development from a personal angle. I was lucky to get his time and attention. Trent is a busy family man, a writer, a blogger and much more.

How I Got Overeducated and Loaded with Debt

My first culture shock was when I got admitted to an American University. It was not an Ivy League school, not a private college. I got admitted to a small town University with a good name and decent reputation. I came as a foreign student on a scholarship. The scholarship that I was awarded barely covered half of the cost of the tuition. It did not cover textbooks. As a foreign full-time student my tuition was a little over $4,500. The scholarship was a little bit under $1,500. The first year in school my stepfather generously covered the difference. He also bought me the textbooks.